Jason Cohen Pittsburgh - Amazon 2

Will Pittsburgh Be Home for Amazon HQ2? Part II

With over $5 billion in potential community investment and 50,000 jobs on the line, every city wants to host Amazon’s second headquarters. Since the company announced its intent to expand in BLAH, over NUMBER of cities have tosses their metaphorical hats into the ring. Over the past few months, the company has parsed through the submissions with all the quiet drama and political silence of a reality dating show. Just recently, Amazon officially released the names on its shortlist. Pittsburgh made the cut, as did Boston, Toronto, Atlanta, and Newark. But with so much drama surrounding the company’s choice, we’re left to wonder: How many names on this overhyped list are actual competitors, and which are just for show? Perhaps more importantly, does Pittsburgh stand a fighting chance? A few months ago, I published a post that assessed the city’s chances as a host – and now, I’ll take a closer look into the details that will either push the city above the rest or force it out of the game.

Many pro-Pittsburgh parties are optimistic about the city’s chances – and have ample reason to be. Pittsburgh is already well-known in corporate circles as a hub for advancement; the city hosts a thriving tech community and well-regarded talent pool. As Jim Rock, the CEO for the Pittsburgh-based robotics company Seegrid comments in an article for TribLIVE, “Pittsburgh has a long-standing reputation for innovation–long before top tech companies such as Apple, Google, Uber and even Amazon itself established a presence in the city.” More than a few high-level Amazon executives even have personal or professional connections to the city. But Pittsburgh’s culture and network isn’t the only draw in the city’s pitch; the area also financially attractive. The cost of commercial state is relatively low – especially when compared to those in its’ rival cities. The average cost per square foot of commercial real estate in Boston, for example, averages $50 per square foot. In Pittsburgh, the cost stands at around $30 per square foot.  

Pittsburgh’s advantages are clear. However, the city does face a number of challenges that may make it less attractive to Amazon’s board, including its comparatively modest workforce. HQ2 stands to make 50,000 jobs once it opens – and while that may sound impressive on paper, the open positions won’t do the community or company any good if there aren’t people to fill them. According to  a 2016 study by Allegheny Conference on Community, increasing retirement rates and an insufficient influx of workers could cause Pittsburgh to lose as many as 80,000 workers by 2025. Mayor Bill Peduto isn’t concerned, though; at a press conference shortly after the shortlist went public, he expressed his belief that Pittsburgh was more than equipped to compete with the other cities on the shortlist and could attract the workers if chosen. Currently, the city has made strides to cultivate talent and STEM interest in schools in an attempt to encourage young workers to pursue careers in tech. This all said, the city’s low workforce will be a factor Amazon will need to keep in mind when making their final selection.

It is worth noting that the so-called “shortlist” is not all that short. Amazon has approached the process with the calculation of a career politician and the dramatic savvy of a reality dating show, thereby fostering a competitive culture which will surely be to their benefit. The company even requested that those in Pittsburgh government sign a nondisclosure agreement and limit their communications to a single representative for greater confidentiality. It is unclear whether officials will comply with their request – but with the importance of the issue, silence seems likely. Pittsburgh stands as a fantastic candidate for HQ2; however, the choice ultimately comes down to Amazon.  With all of the secrecy and drama seen thus far, we can probably expect a few more months of drawn-out competitions and closed doors.

For more of Jason Cohen’s work, please visit JasonCohenPittsburgh.org.

Originally posted on JasonCohenPittsburgh.net


Will Pittsburgh be Home for Amazon HQ2?

Jason Cohen is a Pittsburgh-based real estate investor with over a decade of experience in his field. Cohen firmly believes in the value of research prior to investment, and took a considerable amount of time to research the risk and rewards inherent in the Amazon deal. Below, Jason Cohen outlines his findings.

How far would your home city go to attract Amazon’s attention? In August, the tech giant announced its intention to build a second headquarters in North America, prompting a deluge of enticements and bargains – some tinged with more than a little desperation. One tiny city in Georgia even went so far as to offer to change its name to Amazon if it was chosen. Bargains like these seem absurd, but it’s easy enough to see why prospective HQ2 cities would go to such lengths to attract attention. The tech giant promises to invest $5 billion in its satellite facility, and bring with it over 5,000 high-paying jobs. As Steve Glickman, cofounder and executive director of the Economic Innovation Group, puts it in an article for CNNMoney, winning the bid for HQ2 is akin to “winning the lottery […] [it’s] an event you can’t duplicate any other way.” With over 230 cities vying for placement, catching Amazon’s interest is a long shot – but some economic analysts think that Pittsburgh, PA has a solid chance of being the company’s next home.

Currently, Pittsburgh ranks in the #5 spot in Moody Analytics‘ list of top contenders. The Forbes-recognized analytical firm took factors such as business environment, available human capital, transportation availability, quality of life, and the cost of doing business when making their considerations. According to their report, Amazon’s ideal satellite site would offer a bargain tax package and affordable land, as well as a supply of workers and the means to support them via transportation and housing. Pittsburgh itself stands above its competition as an already-burgeoning tech hub and thriving city center. It also has the advantage of being within several Amazon executives’ home state;CFO Brian Olavsky, for example, is from Hershey, PA. The city declared its candidacy as many cities did: via a cheery video offering Amazon a home within its borders.

Given the immense potential investment and promise for unheard-of levels of economic growth, every city wants to snag Amazon’s HQ2.  But as a whole, real estate investment advisors within Jason Cohen Pittsburgh are hesitant to leap onto the pro-Amazon wagon. In the promise of incipient wealth, many cities have overlooked the glaring problems that will accompany the company’s second site. For a glimpse of what might come if Amazon sets its roots in Pittsburgh, one only has to look to California. On the west coast, tech companies have sparked massive growth in city economies – and dramatic housing shortages. Affordable apartments are hard to come by in cities like LA, where a 2-bedroom apartment can cost over $4,000 per month in rent, nearly twice the national average. Even the best deals come with a catch – and Amazon’s too-good-to-be-true promise of  investment is no exception.

Amazon hasn’t chosen a location for its second home yet, and its deliberations have become a constant topic of speculation. But perhaps the question should be turned on its head; rather than asking, “What city will Amazon choose,” we should wonder “Will our city accept Amazon?” In the glitz and glam of potential growth, cities have forgotten the high housing cost the company will unwittingly place on Pittsburgh’s current citizens. Amazon’s deal is built with fool’s gold – and those at Jason Cohen Pittsburgh urge those in the city to consider the risks before leaping at its potential rewards.

How to Find a Great Real Estate Agent

Jason Cohen is the founder and president of Jason Cohen Pittsburgh, an informal real estate group which provides constructive advice to professionals considering property investments. Given his near-constant interpersonal work with other professionals in the field, Jason is well-equipped to offer guidance on the process of finding a competent real estate agent. Here, Cohen offers his thoughts.


What separates a great real estate agent from an ineffective one? In a social-media landscape where every realtor’s promotions are glossy and attractive, it can be hard for regular buyers and

sellers to discern whether the agents they research are actually the capable, honest professionals they appear to be online. However, there are some steps that real estate hopefuls can take to ensure a successful professional relationship before officially signing on with an agent. The following tips are brought to you by Jason Cohen, the president and founder of the informal real estate advising group, Jason Cohen Pittsburgh – consider observing them prior to committing to a real estate professional!


Check Qualifications
Every buyer and seller needs to make sure that the agent they hire is equipped to manage their needs. It’s especially important to find a professional affiliated with the National Association of Realtors – you can determine this by checking to see if the agent notes their title with a capital “R.” Those in the NAR pledge to follow a code of ethics, and will be held accountable for any professional wrongdoing in the field. This code protects clients from potentially troublesome action on the part of the agent. Clients should also check to make sure that the agent specializes in handling cases like theirs. For instance, an individual looking to buy a house should search for a realtor with an ABR certification: These professionals are Accredited Buyer’s Representatives, and have completed additional courses for representing buyers in transactions.


Review Agent Records

Clients should also direct their research towards answering a few basic questions: How long has the agent been in business? Are their current listings similar to yours? Does the agent have any marks on their record? While the first two can be answered through an online search or direct conversation with the agent, the last question should be directed towards the applicable state regulatory body, which will have a record of any concerns or complaints.


Reach Out to Previous Clients

Don’t be afraid to ask a potential agent for a list of former clients! Reaching out to previous home buyers and/or sellers will help you better understand the agent’s skill set, capabilities, and professionalism. Make sure to ask for details; how long was the client’s home on the market? How much did it sell for? Was the agent friendly and helpful, or were they professionally challenging? All of these questions will help you come to a decision when choosing a professional to represent your real estate interests.


For more helpful advice and intriguing articles, please visit Jason Cohen Pittsburgh’s blog at JasonCohenPittsburgh.org.

Jason Cohen Pittsburgh - Hand Tips for First Time Landlords

Handy Tips for First-Time Landlords

Jason Cohen has been an active investor within the Pittsburgh real estate community for nearly a decade. While he began his industry efforts by purchasing and renovating cheap residential buildings in high-potential neighborhoods, he has since expanded his investments to large-scale commercial and residential properties in vibrant neighborhoods. Here, Jason Cohen provides a few tips to new landlords.  


You’ve finally done it. You’ve purchased the building, touched up the paint, laid the carpet, and put your first investment property up for rent. But as the inquiries come in, you realize that the easy part is over – now, you have to deal effectively with your tenants. Jason Cohen Pittsburgh is an advising group operating in the city; as such, its veteran members have heard their fair share of first-time rental horror stories. It’s common for a first-time investor to be so caught up in the buy and the renovation process that they find themselves at a loss when they need to communicate professionally with the people living in their units. Unfortunately for landlords, the work doesn’t end when the contractors leave. Below, Jason Cohen, head of Jason Cohen Pittsburgh lists a few tips for aspiring landlords to take note of before opening their doors to tenants.


Be Assertive

Everyone has an off month now and again. Sometimes, a tenant can’t make a payment on the day it comes due – and in some cases, that’s okay. Landlords should be empathetic and understanding if a tenant faces tragedy or finds himself in a temporary financial crunch, so long as the tenant communicates the situation. If, however, the tenant chooses to go dark and refuse to pay the agreed-upon rental sum, landlords need to act assertively. You need the rent they owe you to keep up the building and make a profit. Being overly understanding to an elusive or underpaying tenant will only result in your missing needed funds. Be assertive! Don’t be afraid of pursuing a delinquent tenant for the money they owe you.


Check Credit and References

Never rent to someone who doesn’t have a job or has a credit score of under 600. Those without the means to pay rent or a history of regular repayment will inevitably leave you waiting for payments that may never come. Screen your potential tenants closely to ensure that they will be responsible, reliable occupants who will care for your unit and pay on time.


Make Smart Renovations

Don’t install marble countertops if your unit is in a low-income neighborhood. In all likelihood, those that inquire about your unit will be looking to pay a rent in line with those offered in nearby homes; if you try to cover a fancy renovation by asking a significantly higher rent, your prospective tenants will walk. Be smart, and don’t risk renovations that offer little return!


Be Organized

Organization is key to any successful business venture. After all, how will you know you made a profit if you have no documentation of the fact? Ensure your success by keeping organized and detailed records!


For more tips, advice, and real estate content, please visit Jason’s site at JasonCohenPittsburgh.org.