5 Red Flags Home Buyers Should Take Note Of

As a veteran real estate professional working in Pittsburgh, Jason Cohen well-equipped to assess the risks and potential associated with a property. In this post, Jason Cohen uses his hard-won experience to highlight a few red flags that buyers should make note of when they tour a home.

With their new appliances, sleek countertops, and freshly-painted walls, remodeled houses are meant to impress. For a potential buyer conducting their first walk-through, the surface appeal of a touched-up house can be appealing; however, first-time buyers should avoid making a decision based off of aesthetic appeal. Unfortunately, a number of renovators choose to prioritize cheap cosmetic updates over more vital (and expensive) structural renovations – leaving the unaware buyer with the heavy financial burden of making expensive repairs. Don’t be pulled in by a flashy hack job – watch out for these warning signs when you walk through a home!

Cracks in the Walls

Contrary to what old horror movies might suggest, wall cracks aren’t par for course in old homes. Watch out for splits in brick walls, and makes sure to consult an expert if you think a wall fissure might be more than a cosmetic problem. Don’t take the issue lightly! Wall cracks can indicate severe structural issues and shouldn’t be left unchecked.

Old Roofing

The last thing a buyer wants to do after shelling out tens – or hundreds – of thousands of dollars on a home is sink even more resources into fixing its roof. When built well, roofs remain strong for roughly thirty years. When done incorrectly, they last for considerably less time and can demand as much as $30,000 to repair. Be proactive by enlisting the help of an expert to inspect the roof or asking to see the property’s inspection records.

Fresh Paint in an Old House

A fresh layer of paint usually isn’t something to worry about. However, if it seems as though a house hasn’t been fixed up beside a few patches of paint on the ceiling, beware! Some sellers attempt to cover up termite or water damage by painting over it. Make sure to ask the seller about any suspicious paint jobs before you proceed with the buy.

Water in the Basement

Properly maintained basements aren’t soggy. Moreover, buyers who see water in the basement should worry about more than cleaning on rainy days; according to home inspector William Kibbel, “The wettest crawlspaces (and basements) seem to be directly related to exterior drainage issues. Ground sloping towards the foundation, clogged or missing gutters, and downspouts not properly extended can all contribute to elevated moisture levels and even regular water intrusion.” If you have the funds and time to optimize a home’s exterior drainage problems, you should purchase the house. Otherwise, you may want to let the property go.

Uneven Flooring

Saggy flooring near a home’s bathrooms often indicates greater problems with the property’s plumbing system. Make sure to have an inspector check the plumbing, lest you find yourself with serious issues down the line!

Never, ever be afraid to ask questions. Buyers are entitled to the right to inspect potential purchases and ensure that they really are getting everything they pay for. Take walk-through inspections seriously, and don’t be fooled by a flashy renovation!

*Originally posted on JasonCohenPittsburgh.net

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s